Let Me See That Bottle

Quite often
on warning labels
of various pharmaceuticals
Or “pharmies” as we junkies
call them
on the street.
The bottle says in big bold writing,
“DO NOT TAKE WITH ALCOHOL.”

Some labels say:
“Do not take with alcohol.”
“Do not operate heavy machinery.”
and
“This medication may cause dizziness.”

These are the kind of warnings
that get this
trash can
addict
excited,
and willing to slam a
handful with a beer
while operating
heavy machinery.

And, the dizziness;
Hell, the dizziness
is what I am after.

Normal people get dizzy,
or have one too many
beers
and they get nervous,
panic
because they realize
they are no longer
in control.

Addicts seek out
this lack
of
control
without panic,
free from being
nervous
unless, of course, they feel
an overdose approaching.

When it
comes
to reading
pill bottles
every
single
addict
becomes dyslexic!

The bottle will read
“Take 2 pills every 6 hours”…
For a normal person,
But an addict can look at the
same bottle
and it will read
“Take 6 pills every 2 hours.”

And God forbid the bottle reads:
“Take as needed”
Because an addict, like myself
can easily
polish off a bottle
of pills
over the course of
24 hours!

I’ll look at that pill bottle
like a tiny box of
orange tic-tacs!

Everybody knows
that the orange tic-tacs
are nothing but candy
and don’t do
a damn thing
to get rid
of bad breath.

Like the flavors
of tic-tacs,
each “pharmie” has
its own
characteristics
both alone and
when mixed with alcohol!

The best “pharmies”
to eat with alcohol
are benzodiazapans
or “benzos” and
opiate based
painkillers.

The benzo family
of pills includes
Valium, Xanex, Kolonipin,
and so forth.
A well trained junky
will even know the generic names
for each of these pills
as well as the color, shape, taste
and especially the D.E.A. number
stamped on the back.

When you’re buying pills
off the street
jokers, con-men, and thieves
will try to sell any and
everything
they can.

So you better know the tricks of the trade.

A well trained junky
knows
how to call poison control
because they will tell you
exactly what type of pill
you are dealing with
from the name of it to what it
is prescribed for, all the way down
to its side effects.

I had one cat
at a Greyhound station in New Orleans
trying to sell
generic valium.
Now generic names for valium
include Ativan and Diazopan
but bottom line
I had never seen a pill like
this one with over a decade
worth of drug addiction
under my belt.

So I hop on the phone
with poison control
describe this
Alien pill,
and the lady on the other end
says, “I’ll call you right back.”
by this time
the dude trying to sling me
these pills
starts getting pissed off.
And I’m just keeping him
at bay until poison control calls back.

My cell phone starts vibrating…
“Hello.”
“Hello Mickey, this is poison control
calling back. The pill you described
Is an anti-psychotic with side effects
that include: diarrhea, seizures, dehydration,
headaches, insomnia, and erectile dysfunction.”

I said, “thank you.” And hung up the phone.
I told the dude he might wanna take his
Schizophryenic pill
before
the voices come back.

He told me to screw off
and walked away.

“Pharmies”
are just as much
of a demon
as heroin or cocaine,
especially when it comes to
benzos.
You can actually die
from benzo withdrawals.

So to make a long story
short…
I completely forgot exactly
where this War Story
was going, so I
finish with

THE END.

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